Distributed Agile and Off-sure Agile Resources

Off-shore agile, outsourcing agile teams, distributed agile, leverageing globalisation third world markets – or whatever it is you call it – creates additional process management work for teams. The question is whats the impact to business benefits, customer satisfaction, quality product, and healthy culture?

Different clients i’ve coached have approached distributed agile product delivery in a variety of ways and yet they each encountered similar challenges that are worth keeping in mind:
– Overcomeing the distance to maintain good face-to-face communication flow
– Establishing seamless infrastructure; environments, task management, knowledge management tools
– Governing quality development and output
– Customer satisfaction mindset
Below are three interesting articles that explain well; their strategy, execution and learning by experience.

Martin Fowler of Thoughtworks shares his perspective on the Thoughtworks Bangalore off-shore agile services to their European and USA agile houses, and customers.
http://www.martinfowler.com/articles/agileOffshore.html
Martin Fowlers top learnong list;
– Use Continuous Integration to Avoid Integration Headaches
– Have Each Site Send Ambassadors to the Other Sites
– Use Contact Visits to build trust
– Don’t Underestimate the Culture Change
– Use wikis to contain common information
– Use Test Scripts to Help Understand the Requirements
– Use Regular Builds to Get Feedback on Functionality
– Use Regular Short Status Meetings
– Use Short Iterations
– Use an Iteration Planning Meeting that’s Tailored for Remote Sites
– When Moving a Code Base, Bug Fixing Makes a Good Start
– Separate teams by functionality not activity
Expect to need more documents
– Get multiple communication modes working early
– Costs and Benefits of Offshore Development

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To better understand who has been doing it well and for a long time ive selected the below from Microsofts pool of off-shore agile articles. It’s short, too the point and gives some practicle how tos.
– agile practice trends
– insight to the right tools i.e. integration
– communication, communication, communication

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb245671.aspx

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And last but not least a nice checklist infographic to consider

attribution to QAT.com with this graphic

’Nearshoring

Using Kanban to simplify and save time on complex enterprise integration projects

Often the introduction of new methodologies and change programs are overwhelming for important professionals whom have no capacity for “another fandangle change movement” as a wonderful engineer once told me. He is quite right! All too often agile change programs are directed upon people without; compartmentalising time to complete current expectations, time to learn, and time to practice the new introduced methods.

Kanban BoardThe example below is based on an engagement with a very small and extremely important Environment & Configuration Team supporting multiple project teams through releases every 8 weeks across an 8 digit valued delivery program of work. Often these operation teams are the engines that can’t stop; they service multiple managers, teams and departments; and the last thing they (think they) want right now is to give precious time working with (another) Lean Agile coach. Add to that boiling mix of gurgling soup was a built up agile coaching resistance. I was the fourth Coach brought into to assist because previous adoptions hadn’t achieved fluidity; the combination of high demand, complex conditions, and conflicting relations had burnt through the well intentioned previous coaches.

As coaches we know that time invested in Lean and Agile methods is time exponentially returned; however, even after reviewing the evidence, many people are literally too stressed to consider new ways of working.

“I can’t make the old way work after all this time, and they said that was a new better way of working back then too!”

So I decide to go with the flow. If that was there world, then I became in rhythm with it, and rather than interrupt it with new ways of working I decided to add a new beat that was in compliment to the flow of work they had to maintain.

First I sat with them – there home was my home. I observed their world carefully – the patterns and streams of work in flow. I listened, and listened to assure that I truly understood what was happening. I listened to what was truly important to these guys and then in a briefing to the Solution Manager on the approach and why he will get value for endorsing my coaching, it came out almost like a whilted hope that had long ago become impossible. One of the guys said “I’d just love to get home to dinner with my son at least once a week”. There it was, the underlying “why this is valuable to me”. Without that why as a coach you won’t get people buying tickets to your agile journey. That become our commitment we would all work for.

Secondly, with managerial nod and a very human aspiration I negotiated just 15 minutes a day to start adding in all that good healthy agile stuff!

15 minutes a day is initially not a daunting amount of time to give up, to start focus on learning, and it also became the most important time of the day as it set the focus and created opportunity to continuously improve. (As a coach it was excellent as it also trained me to be very succinct and relevant in the teachings during that short time.)  First it was 15 minutes of listening daily (in person, fact was at that time I was 80% listening, watching, learning about them and 20% coaching).

As the days progressed the team were able to expand their ‘learning listening’ to take on doing personal kanban – a wonderfully simple Lean framework to initiate agile principles and a good coaching engagement.  Stage by stage, day by day I guided the team through visualising ALL their work, and to build understanding of the demand tunnels that previously drove their work. Identifying where they create value, and how much they do to fix failures. They practiced flow through concepts, experimenting with their WIPs. They achieved an extraneous amount of work in their first month. Not necessarily a massive chunk greater overall, that wasn’t important. They did it without having to do the normal amount of overtime.  Not only did they surprise themselves, the key reward was being able to sit back and actually see their achievements on the wall, share those achievements, understand their capacity and start to go home proud.  Previous to seeing their accomplishments visualised on the wall they stated “I’d just go home and pass out on the coach wandering if I was ever going to get on top of it all”.

Over the second month the team tested out concepts of focus, noise deflection, prioritisation models, retrospection and request methods to really hone their self organising skills. The 15 minutes would occasionally expand as the team needed. The beautiful thing was that the time extension was their choice based on their needs. They were experiencing a return on their 15min time investment for themselves and as a coach I was accessible, available and pulled the knowledge they needed when they needed it. If I didn’t know the answers on the spot I would research, investigate and find the resources or people that they needed.

In the third month the team felt confident enough to initiate their own program group stand-ups. The team pulled together the key doers from the multiple areas they serviced. The content focus of the stand-up was their shared work area. In essence the team – who three months earlier was too under the pump to learn Lean & Agile methods – was now hosting their own stand-ups, running an improvements backlog and teaching others what they had learnt 15 minutes a day.

In my following articles I’ll share how they become the base rhythm by which everyone else followed, and the third key element in their journey, Continuous Integration successes.

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